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Embellished with Nature

Dungeness was a gift of about 10,000 acres of prime land to show gratitude for Nathanael Greene’s service to his country. “The grounds are beautifully laid out, and are embellished with flower-gardens, and handsome groves, and avenues of olive trees.”

Appletons’ Illustrated Hand-book of American Winter Resorts, D. Appleton

My name is Marsanne Petty, and I’m a researcher through and through. I chase obscure topics into the end of oblivion and compile what I find for all to read. Sometimes my family thinks I’m crazy, but my dogs are good with it. If you want to follow me down the rabbit hole, check out my stuff here and here. If you want some great oddities in your own mail box, sign up at The Southern Sage.

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Nathanael’s Death Room

“I remember well the large room with its unfinished walls of tabby-work in which he died, and the little grave-yard in a corner of an old cotton field in which he was buried, within a few feet of my grandmother’s grave.”

— The Life of Nathanael Greene, George Washington Greene

My name is Marsanne Petty, and I’m a researcher through and through. I chase obscure topics into the end of oblivion and compile what I find for all to read. Sometimes my family thinks I’m crazy, but my dogs are good with it. If you want to follow me down the rabbit hole, check out my stuff here and here. If you want some great oddities in your own mail box, sign up at The Southern Sage.

Dungeness

“The magnificent mansion was burned in the early part of the civil war, but the ruins still stand firm as a rock, the massive old coquina-stone walls having actually been hardened by the fire.”

Florida for Tourists, Invalids and Settlers, George M. Barbour

My name is Marsanne Petty, and I’m a researcher through and through. I chase obscure topics into the end of oblivion and compile what I find for all to read. Sometimes my family thinks I’m crazy, but my dogs are good with it. If you want to follow me down the rabbit hole, check out my stuff here and here. If you want some great oddities in your own mail box, sign up at The Southern Sage.

Cumberland Island’s Lush Grapevines

pexels-photo-197907

On the lushness of Cumberland Island:

“On this island, before the late war, was seen a scuppernong grape-vine, nearly three hundred years old, supposed to have been planted by the Spanish missionaries. It was then pronounced a prolific bearer, producing two thousand pounds of fruit per annum, and covering nearly three acres of ground.”

Petals Plucked from Sunny Climes. Silvia Sunshine

My name is Marsanne Petty, and I’m a researcher through and through. I chase obscure topics into the end of oblivion and compile what I find for all to read. Sometimes my family thinks I’m crazy, but my dogs are good with it. If you want to follow me down the rabbit hole, check out my stuff here and here. If you want some great oddities in your own mail box, sign up at The Southern Sage.

 

Nathanael Greene’s Garden

Nathanael Greene on his St. Simon’s Island garden: “The mocking-birds that sing around me morning and evening, the mild and balmy atmosphere, with the exercise which I find in my garden culture.”

Petals Plucked from Sunny Climes. Silvia Sunshine

My name is Marsanne Petty, and I’m a researcher through and through. I chase obscure topics into the end of oblivion and compile what I find for all to read. Sometimes my family thinks I’m crazy, but my dogs are good with it. If you want to follow me down the rabbit hole, check out my stuff here and here. If you want some great oddities in your own mail box, sign up at The Southern Sage.

 

On St. Simon’s

pexels-photo-760281.jpeg

“Natural paths and arbors were found here by the English, as if formed by the hand of art, with the ripe grapes hanging in festoons of a royal purple hue.”

Petals Plucked from Sunny Climes. Silvia Sunshine

My name is Marsanne Petty, and I’m a researcher through and through. I chase obscure topics into the end of oblivion and compile what I find for all to read. Sometimes my family thinks I’m crazy, but my dogs are good with it. If you want to follow me down the rabbit hole, check out my stuff here and here. If you want some great oddities in your own mail box, sign up at The Southern Sage.

 

Where Savannah’s Dead Sleep

Bonaventure_Cemetery,_Savannah,_Georgia-LCCN2008678153
1901. Via Library of Congress.

What a beautiful sleeping place!

“Bonaventure cemetery is about three miles from town, and is one of the most beautiful places I have ever seen, even in a land where beauties of nature are everywhere. A wide shell road leads for about half a mile through what seems a vast forest, with the live oak draped in gray moss meeting overhead, while all is still, but for the rustle of the grass, as a little chameleon peeps at you with his bright eyes and then hastens away. After walking quite a distance you come out into the graveyard proper. There under tall trees and waving moss, rare flowers and in sound of the never-ceasing roar and murmur of the ocean, sleep Savannah’s dead.”

Savannah by the Sea.

 

My name is Marsanne Petty, and I’m a researcher through and through. I chase obscure topics into the end of oblivion and compile what I find for all to read. Sometimes my family thinks I’m crazy, but my dogs are good with it. If you want to follow me down the rabbit hole, check out my stuff here and here. If you want some great oddities in your own mail box, sign up at The Southern Sage.

The Squares of Savannah

appleton_s_illustrated_hand_book_of_amer-public-square-savannah-ga-1884.png
Appleton’s Illustrated Handbook of American Winter Resorts

In 1773, James Oglethorpe began his grand plan for Savannah – laying out squares for the community to enjoy and utilize. By 1851, there were 24 squares.

“The number of squares has now been increased to twenty-four—the walks all being paved with granite, and swept daily. Forsyth Park is on a more extended plan than these small squares, containing a large fountain, fine flowers, magnolia grandiflora trees, a small zoölogical collection—all objects of interest, displaying the taste and refinement of a well-cultured people.”

Petals Plucked from Sunny Climes. Silvia Sunshine.

 

My name is Marsanne Petty, and I’m a researcher through and through. I chase obscure topics into the end of oblivion and compile what I find for all to read. Sometimes my family thinks I’m crazy, but my dogs are good with it. If you want to follow me down the rabbit hole, check out my stuff here and here. If you want some great oddities in your own mail box, sign up at The Southern Sage.

Nature takes over

Originally consisting of 70 acres of Bonaventure Plantation, the cemetery served as a gathering place for family picnics as well as solace for those left behind. Nature was not pleased with man’s tinkering, however, and constantly attempted to regain her lost land. John Muir tells us:

“It is interesting to observe how assiduously Nature seeks to remedy these labored art blunders. She corrodes the iron and marble, and gradually levels the hill which is always heaped up, as if a sufficiently heavy quantity of clods Could not be laid on the dead. Arching grasses come one by one; seeds come flying on downy wings, silent as fate, to give life’s dearest beauty for the ashes of art; and strong evergreen arms laden with ferns and tillandsia drapery are spread over all — Life at work everywhere, obliterating all memory of the confusion of man.”

— A Thousand-Mile Walk to the Gulf. John Muir, 1916.

To read more about Bonaventure cemetery, click here.

My name is Marsanne Petty, and I’m a researcher through and through. I chase obscure topics into the end of oblivion and compile what I find for all to read. Sometimes my family thinks I’m crazy, but my dogs are good with it. If you want to follow me down the rabbit hole, check out my stuff here and here. If you want some great oddities in your own mail box, sign up at The Southern Sage.

 

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