Nature takes over

Originally consisting of 70 acres of Bonaventure Plantation, the cemetery served as a gathering place for family picnics as well as solace for those left behind. Nature was not pleased with man’s tinkering, however, and constantly attempted to regain her lost land. John Muir tells us:

“It is interesting to observe how assiduously Nature seeks to remedy these labored art blunders. She corrodes the iron and marble, and gradually levels the hill which is always heaped up, as if a sufficiently heavy quantity of clods Could not be laid on the dead. Arching grasses come one by one; seeds come flying on downy wings, silent as fate, to give life’s dearest beauty for the ashes of art; and strong evergreen arms laden with ferns and tillandsia drapery are spread over all — Life at work everywhere, obliterating all memory of the confusion of man.”

— A Thousand-Mile Walk to the Gulf. John Muir, 1916.

To read more about Bonaventure cemetery, click here.

My name is Marsanne Petty, and I’m a researcher through and through. I chase obscure topics into the end of oblivion and compile what I find for all to read. Sometimes my family thinks I’m crazy, but my dogs are good with it. If you want to follow me down the rabbit hole, check out my stuff here and here. If you want some great oddities in your own mail box, sign up at The Southern Sage.

 

Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Please log in using one of these methods to post your comment:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s

WordPress.com.

Up ↑